Why we can’t ignore the Book of Jude

Simon and Jude martyred; ms. circa 1455.

Simon and Jude martyred; ms. circa 1455. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Did you know that Jude is the only book given entirely to the great apostasy?  The Book of Jude is only one chapter with 24 verses. It may be the shortest book of the Bible, but it is very important. The very first verse identifies the author of the Book of Jude as  a brother of James, and Jesus’ half-brother.  The book was written somewhere between A.D. 60 and 80.

Jude writes that evil works are the evidence of apostasy. He admonishes us to contend for the faith, for there are tares among the wheat. False prophets are in the church and the saints are in danger.  Christians today will find these words very relevant, as we must be on guard for false doctrines which can so easily deceive us if we are not well versed in the Word. We need to know the Gospel—to protect and defend it—and accept the Lordship of Christ, which is evidenced by a life-change.

You can read along with us today in the Book of Jude (pick your favorite translation), as well as 2 Peter, which is very closely related.


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One Response to Why we can’t ignore the Book of Jude

  1. Kevin Kleint says:

    This warning is SO relevant for our time. Fortunately, God saw to it that the Word would be approximately 1/3 full of writings from prophets that WE can use for reference! Unfortunately, most people think that somehow prophecy changed from the Old Testament to the New Testament. The false prophets capitalize on this error to further their message.

    Like

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